Clinical Studies — Antioxidants

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.) as a Source of Bioactive Phytochemicals with Pro-Health Properties

Posted by Michael Burmeister on

This review highlights the most important characteristics and possible applications of AG. Among numerous studies AG was documented to exert beneficial activity towards nervous system. It boosts memory, increases calmness, and enhances cognitive performance []. It has therapeutic potential in treatment of Alzheimer disease and anxiety [,]. It also affects cardiovascular system—changes cardiac structure in hypertension, reduces heart rate, inhibits hypertrophy and heart failure [,,,]. Furthermore, AG prevents oesophageal damage resulted from reflux oesophagitis and formation of ulcer in gastric mucosa [,]. Apart from that, it displays antimicrobial activity against different pathogenic strains of bacteria including resistant to antibiotics S. aureus strain []. AG is extensively investigated in terms of anti-cancer activity. It promotes apoptosis of cancer cells and alters many different signalling pathways important for cancer transformation [,,,,,,,]. It also protects normal cells from unwanted side effects of anti-cancer drugs and diminishes cancer-related fatigue [,]. However, the mechanisms underlying beneficial activity of AG in cancer is not fully understood. Administration of AG may be beneficial for individuals suffering from obesity and diabetes. It enhances sensitivity of tissues to insulin and inhibits formation of adipose tissue. Also, polysaccharides of AG were reported to display pro-health effects by stimulating the immune system. Assinewe et al. observed that polysaccharide of AG extract containing glucose, galactose, arabinose, rhamnose, and mannose displayed cytokine-stimulating activity on macrophages. In this study, aqueous extracts of AG roots (1–100 μg/mL) stimulated the release of immunoreactive TNF, contributing to the activation of macrophages []. Yu et al. also showed immunostimulatory effect of the fraction of polysaccharide present in AG extract (50–400 μg/mL). AG extract application led to enhancement of splenic lymphocyte proliferation, macrophage phagocytosis and nitric oxide production []. AG extract (125 mg/kg for 3–6 days) stimulated alveolar macrophages in rats associated with increased level of NO, TNF-α and IL-6 in plasma []. These results were in agreement with those obtained by Azike. Similarly, AdG water extract (125 mg/kg) administered to rats for 3–6 days upregulated nitric oxide, TNF-α and IL-6. Within in vitro study macrophages were incubated with different concentrations of AG. A dose-dependent immunostimulatory activity of aqueous and alcohol extracts of AG (50–200 μg/mL) in rat macrophages was observed and an in vitro effect was more pronounced than corresponding in vivo result due to relatively low bioavailability of the extract administrated orally []. As the methodology of AG separation is poorly developed, it is a promising direction for the future research.

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Ginseng: An Nonnegligible Natural Remedy for Healthy Aging

Posted by Michael Burmeister on

Aging is a complicated process with multiple modulations occurring at many levels, from the molecular to the cells. Ginseng, an ancient Chinese herb widely used in Eastern medicine, has been studied for its anti-aging properties., and has been shown to have beneficial effects with regards to anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, cardiovascular regulation, neurological improvement, anti-tumor, skin protection and immune modulation. 

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American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium)

Posted by Michael Burmeister on

American ginseng is a light tan, gnarled root that often looks like a human body with stringy shoots for arms and legs. Native Americans used the root as a stimulant and to treat headaches, fever, indigestion, and infertility. Ginseng remains one of the most popular herbs in the United States.

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A review on the medicinal potentials of ginseng and ginsenosides on cardiovascular diseases

Posted by Michael Burmeister on

Panax ginseng is a traditional herbal medicine that has been used therapeutically for more than 2000 years. It is the most valuable of all medicinal plants, especially in Korea, China, and Japan. The name panax means 'all healing,' and has possibly stemmed from traditional belief that the various properties of ginseng can heal all aspects of the illness encountered by the human body (i.e., it acts as a panacea for the human body) ... The active constituent ginsenosides play a vital role in the medicinal effects of ginseng. Ginsenosides exhibit their vast range of activities on CVD through the inhibition of ROS production, stimulation of NO production, improvement in blood circulation, enhancement of vasomotor tone, and regulation of the lipid profile.

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American ginseng suppresses inflammation and DNA damage associated with mouse colitis

Posted by Michael Burmeister on

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a dynamic, idiopathic, chronic inflammatory condition associated with a high colon cancer risk. American ginseng has antioxidant properties and targets many of the players in inflammation ... Results are consistent with this hypothesis. The use of American ginseng extract represents a novel therapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of UC.

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